Zach Shepherd's WordPress Blog

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Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Amazon “Quadruple Extra Large” High-Memory Instances

Yesterday Amazon added a High-Memory section of EC2 instances, which included a “Quadruple Extra Large” size. According to the EC2 website, a Quadruple Extra Large instance has “68.4 GB of memory, 26 EC2 Compute Units (8 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each), 1690 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform.” As I wasn’t really clear what the 26 EC2 Compute Units would correspond to, I decided to spin one up and poke around. The results are below:

[root@ip-10-218-21-207 ~]# cat /proc/cpuinfo
processor	: 0
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 0
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor	: 1
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 1
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc up pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor	: 2
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 2
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc up pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor	: 3
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 3
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc up pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor	: 4
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 4
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc up pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor	: 5
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 5
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc up pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor	: 6
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 6
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc up pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor	: 7
vendor_id	: GenuineIntel
cpu family	: 6
model		: 26
model name	: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5550  @ 2.67GHz
stepping	: 5
cpu MHz		: 2666.760
cache size	: 8192 KB
physical id	: 7
siblings	: 1
core id		: 0
cpu cores	: 1
fpu		: yes
fpu_exception	: yes
cpuid level	: 11
wp		: yes
flags		: fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc up pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips	: 5338.47
clflush size	: 64
cache_alignment	: 64
address sizes	: 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

[root@ip-10-218-21-207 ~]# cat /proc/meminfo
MemTotal:     71687580 kB
MemFree:      70139596 kB
Buffers:          4496 kB
Cached:          41520 kB
SwapCached:          0 kB
Active:          15004 kB
Inactive:        35668 kB
SwapTotal:           0 kB
SwapFree:            0 kB
Dirty:             100 kB
Writeback:           0 kB
AnonPages:        4752 kB
Mapped:           5072 kB
Slab:             7960 kB
SReclaimable:     2176 kB
SUnreclaim:       5784 kB
PageTables:        780 kB
NFS_Unstable:        0 kB
Bounce:              0 kB
CommitLimit:  35843788 kB
Committed_AS:    24060 kB
VmallocTotal: 34359738367 kB
VmallocUsed:       180 kB
VmallocChunk: 34359738187 kB

And the results of kernbench were:

Wed Oct 28 15:30:56 EDT 2009
2.6.21.7-2.fc8xen-ec2-v1.0
Average Half load -j 4 Run (std deviation):
Elapsed Time 114.174 (0.646939)
User Time 356.632 (0.178802)
System Time 76.702 (0.189394)
Percent CPU 379.2 (2.16795)
Context Switches 38541.4 (379.793)
Sleeps 75838 (83.7735)

Average Optimal load -j 32 Run (std deviation):
Elapsed Time 65.466 (0.375673)
User Time 362.856 (6.58352)
System Time 84.936 (8.6855)
Percent CPU 542.4 (172.06)
Context Switches 62848.3 (25625.2)
Sleeps 88501.2 (13376.4)

Average Maximal load -j Run (std deviation):
Elapsed Time 65.036 (0.0260768)
User Time 364.585 (5.8557)
System Time 87.3113 (7.78531)
Percent CPU 597.333 (159.682)
Context Switches 64255.9 (20651.1)
Sleeps 83271.7 (13178.6)

posted by Zach at 5:53 pm  

Friday, September 11, 2009

lilurl

For some reason, I decided that I wanted a simple, easy url shortener for personal use. I spent 5 minutes installing lilurl and another 5 minutes hacking in a simple password field (so that only I and people I know can use it).

The hack:

17a18,20
> // Password
> define('MD5_PASS', '5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99');
>
diff -r lilurl/index.php l.zjs.name/index.php
11a12,13
>  if ( md5($_POST['password']) != MD5_PASS ) { die('Incorrect Password'); }
>
179a182,184
>   <br />
>   <label for="password">Enter your password:</label>
>   <input type="password" name="password" id="password" />

posted by Zach at 1:46 pm  

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

“Me”

I’m not sure where I originally got the idea, but at one point I decided it would be a good idea to compile a list of my profiles, accounts, and other web pages related to me. Since then, I’ve been slowly compiling a list of accounts.

This is both for my benefit (so I can keep track of my accounts) and yours (so you can stalk check whether or not a user is me).

This is a work in progress, but I will try to keep it up-to-date. If you see someone you think is me on a website not listed here, drop me an email; It’s very possible that I forgot an account or two.

The list: http://zjs.name/me

posted by Zach at 10:05 pm  

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

My Summer

This summer, I returned to the vCloud team at VMware in Cambridge. I’ve been living in Central Square above Toscanini’s and commuting to Kendall Square on foot, by bike, or, in bad weather, by taking the T.

I’ve had a few recurring events for fun; Pandemonium Books and Games organizes Saturday night Munchkin games and some “Cambervillian” xkcd readers (plus friends) get together for games on a weekly basis (as well as other events).

In June, I presented an Introductory Xen session at Usenix with Wenjin Hu for the second time. Our slides have been posted on the COSI website under a Creative Commons license. This November, I’ll be presenting a similar session at LISA with Professor Matthews.

Last month, Suzanne and I traveled to Provo where we stayed at the to the Seven Stars Resort for a week-long vacation.

Oxt weekend, I will be heading back to Potsdam. On the 17th, Suzanne and I will be moving into our apartment at Clarkson to begin work on the Integrator’s Freshman Survival Guide.

posted by Zach at 9:25 pm  

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Back from another blogging hiatus

There are a few things from this summer I’d like to post about, so I’ll probably be making a few posts over the next few days. I’m not sure how long the enthusiasm will last, but I’ll try to use it productively.

posted by Zach at 7:32 pm  

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Styled output (unix c/c++)

After seeing a program that had colored and styled (bold) output, I decided to look into it. There isn’t a lot of information available, so I’m not sure how widely supported it is. It seems to be compatible with gnome-terminal in a few versions of Ubuntu, but I’m not sure what else (if you try it, let me know).

After a lot of trial-and-error (the tutorials I found were all incomplete), I wrote the following program to output the “code” to style text in any one of 8 colors (with an additional 8 background colors) and 4 styles (plain, bold, underlined, and strikethrough). The output leads me to believe underline is poorly supported (only some text is underlined), but for coloring error messages, this is probably sufficient.

Update: It looks like the proper term for these are ANSI escape codes. When you use the proper term, it’s much easier to find tutorials. I’ll leave this up in case anyone stumbles across it not knowing the proper term.

(more…)

posted by Zach at 7:04 pm  

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

IBM’s XML Challenge: Search for the XML Superstar

IBM has a neat contest going on; there are five categories:Video, Gadget, Query, Porting and XML. It looks fairly straight forward. If anyone is interested in working together on either of the last two (the only team options), let me know!

See http://antoniocangiano.com/2008/12/01/ibms-xml-challenge-lots-of-prizes-inside/ for more information.

posted by Zach at 8:27 am  

Monday, November 10, 2008

Wordpress Update

It looks like updating to the latest version of Wordpress has fixed the various issues I’ve been experiencing with posts not showing up properly and not being added to the RSS feed.

posted by Zach at 1:25 am  

Tuesday, August 5, 2008

Jott

Today, I discovered the wonder that is Jott.

For anyone not familiar with it, it’s a service that lets you call and make a quick verbal note. It then transcribes the audio into text which is emailed to you with the audio clip. You can also have it email a friend, add a Google Calendar event, add a task on Remember the Milk, post to your blogging software, post to twitter, or any number of things. Handy, right?

As a web developer and a general “computer person”,  web technologies don’t usually easily impress me, but this blew me away. It was just so useful and… friendly .

During the account creation process, I was impressed by a very user-friendly form (it explained why each piece of information was needed, accepted my phone number in any format I wanted to enter it in, and gave a very clear success message).

I was then asked to confirm my email followed by my phone number. The first was as easy as clicking a link in the email and the second consisted of calling Jott and entering a confirmation number. After entering the confirmation number (while still on the phone), I went to refresh my browser (as I typically do with confirmation forms) but, before I could, the site had taken care of that for me and redirected me to the dashboard page (a simple feature, but it just adds to the usability ).

Meanwhile (back on the phone), I was making my very first Jott. The prompts are concise and it’s obvious they did their best to keep the process moving; it asks who you want to Jott to, beeps to let you start recording, and tells you “Got it” (at which point you can hang up or stay on the line to edit the Jott or create a new one). No long menus to listen to. No pressing buttons. Completely intuitive.

posted by Zach at 12:31 am  

Friday, May 9, 2008

Find-Replace

Well, I wanted to find and replace over an entire directory (and keep a backup of the old files), and I couldn’t find any straightforward way to do it, so I came up with a nifty little bash command to do it using a for loop and sed.

for $file in $(find . -type f);
do
sed 's/FINDME/REPLACEME/g' $file > $file.tmp;
mv $file $file.bak;
mv $file.tmp $file;
done

posted by Zach at 4:54 pm  
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